Web Colour Charts Menu

=== by Bob Sutherland ===

Web Colour Charts Introduction
Always read the introduction. It hopefully will provide the information you need to understand everything else. In this case there is an explanation of why I created my own colour charts. There is also an explanation of some of the vocabulary and basic technical knowledge I am using to create my colour charts.
216 Web Safe Colours
The 216 web safe colours are created by using all possible combinations of the hexadecimal numbers 00 33 66 99 CC FF for the RGB colour codes. Here I divide the 216 colours up into three charts based on the RGB values. I then create multiple versions of some of the charts by rearranging the colours to see how it might change your perspective of individual colours.
16 + 109 = 125 Colours
Starting with the original 16 colours that were standardized and given names in HTML I then follow patterns I notice in the RGB values to expand the list to 125 colours. All possible combinations of the hexadecimal numbers 00 33 66 99 CC FF are used for the RGB colour codes to create the 125 colours. Many of the charts on this web page are similar to the charts for the 216 Web Safe Colours listed up above.
Triangles and Pyramids for 216 Colours
The 216 web safe colours are divided up and organized into many small colour charts based on their RGB values. The resulting colour charts are in the shapes of triangles and pyramids. Each triangular or pyramid shaped chart is made up from the colours taken from one column of a chart on the 216 Web Safe Colours page. As it is rather difficult to draw a colour chart in the shape of a three dimensional pyramid I make three different attempts at alternative solutions.
Triangles and Pyramids for 125 Colours
The colours from my 16 + 109 = 125 Colours web page are divided up and organized into many small colour charts based on their RGB values. The resulting colour charts are in the shapes of triangles and pyramids. Each triangular or pyramid shaped chart is made up from the colours taken from one column of a chart on the 16 + 109 = 125 Colours page. As it is rather difficult to draw a colour chart in the shape of a three dimensional pyramid I make two different attempts at alternative solutions.
Pastel Colours 1
All possible combinations of the hexadecimal numbers 99 AA BB CC DD EE FF are used in RGB colour codes to create light pastel colours. My intent is to find light colours that can be used as background colours behind text on a web page. The colours are displayed in triangle and pyramid shaped charts. Some of the colours on this page are much brighter or darker than the Pastel Colours 2 page.
Pastel Colours 2
All possible combinations of the hexadecimal numbers CF D7 DF E7 EF F7 FF are used in RGB colour codes to create light pastel colours. My intent is to find light colours that can be used as background colours behind text on a web page. The colours are displayed in triangle and pyramid shaped charts. Overall this colour range tends to be much lighter than the Pastel Colours 1 page.
140 CSS3 Named Colours
The 140 CSS3 Named Colours is a relatively new list of colours that I have just recently discovered. While other colour charts I have found on the Internet list these colours alphabetically by name I have instead organized the colours numerically based on their RGB colour codes. The result is that my arrangement for the 140 CSS3 colours displays them sorted by colour.
Box of Crayons
Here are the eight colours that are most commonly used in primary education teaching materials: red, orange, green, blue, yellow, purple, black and brown.